Lenses. Frames. Contacts.

At Parkwood Vision Center, we provide a variety of products to ensure that we can service any and all of your eyecare needs. Our products range from designer eyewear and contact lenses to protective eyewear and computer glare lenses. See our full list of services below.

Thinner and Lighter Lenses

Do you desire thinner, lighter lenses? People with a lower refractive error generally don’t think about the thickness of their lenses because they have many material options that are thin and light. People who have a stronger prescription, however, will notice a big difference in the weight and the appearance of their lenses with new materials.

Contact Lenses

Millions of people wear different types of contact lenses to help them see clearly. We’ve seen many advancements in lens materials and designs over the years. If you have tried contacts in the past, but stopped due to discomfort or poor quality, it may be time to try again. Dr. Pope will help select the best option for your eyes! We have a variety of options for your specific type of prescription correction, tear production, lifestyle, and more. Contact us at Parkwood Vision Center to learn more.

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Get Thinner and Lighter Lenses
People with a strong prescription usually want the thinnest and lightest lenses possible. Most eyewear choices are made of plastic or metal with rims thinner than the lens. In other cases, the frame has no rim at all and features rimless mountings. In either case, the edges of your lens are highly visible. Thicker edges can detract from the appearance of your eyewear.

The good news is that a variety of new plastic materials are available to provide thinner and lighter lenses. This means less lens material can be used to correct the same amount of prescription. High-index lenses are the thinnest, flattest, and most cosmetically appealing lens ever developed. Most high-index lenses have what is called an aspheric design. In addition to looking thinner, your lenses will also reduce the magnified “bug-eye” or “Coke-bottle” look often caused by thicker lenses.

Ask an optician here at Parkwood Vision Center about which lens material will be best and most comfortable for you!

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Soft Contact Lenses
Soft contacts are the most common type of contact lenses and account for over 85% of contact lenses dispensed. Traditional soft contact lenses consist of soft plastic polymers and water. They allow oxygen to permeate through the lens material to the cornea. Most people find soft contact lenses comfortable. Soft lenses come in different prescriptions and designs depending on your budget and need.

Disposable Contact Lenses
Disposable contact lenses are soft lenses that are discarded on a daily, weekly, bi-weekly, or monthly basis. With regular replacement, protein deposits do not build up. Deposits can affect vision, comfort, and the health of the eyes. These lenses are convenient and low-maintenance compared to traditional soft lenses. It is important to replace disposable contacts as suggested to avoid eye infection. Disposable lenses are available in most prescriptions.

Extended Wear Contact Lenses
Extended wear contact lenses are gas-permeable or soft lenses designed for up to 30 days of continuous safe wear. They offer the convenience of not having to take them out at night, but there are risks. Sleeping in them poses a higher risk of infection, corneal ulcers, and abnormal blood vessel growth in the cornea. These lenses need more frequent follow-ups.

Tinted or Cosmetic Contact Lenses
Tinted contact lenses are soft lenses that enable some patients to change the color of their iris (the colored part of the eye). These lenses are available in interesting colors and patterns. They can provide a subtle or dramatic change in the appearance of your eyes. They are not available for all prescriptions and are not suggested for everyday wear.

Toric Contact Lenses
Toric contact lenses help correct astigmatism. They are available in both soft and gas-permeable designs. These lenses have one power that is vertical and another that is horizontal. There is a weight at the bottom, allowing the lenses to center correctly on the eye. Toric lenses are more difficult to fit. They generally require more time from the patient to determine their comfort. They may need additional fitting help from the doctor.

Bifocal Contact Lenses
Bifocal contact lenses, like bifocal glasses, have more than one power. This allows an individual to have clear vision in fields that are near and far. These lenses are available in both soft and gas-permeable designs. Another alternative to bifocal contacts is monovision correction. With these lenses, one eye is used for distance and the other eye for near or reading vision. Both of these lens types require more time from the doctor for fitting. Patients need to adapt to using one eye, depending on which distance they are viewing.

There are now more choices for contact lenses than ever before. While some individuals wear contact lenses without trouble, others have to try different types to find their perfect pair. Call our office today to schedule an appointment!

Sunglasses

Sunglasses are Fashionable and Functional. While sunlight is a beautiful thing, too much of anything can be harmful. In addition to making a unique fashion statement, sunglasses are also functional and can prevent sun damage to the eyes to improve and protect vision.

Scratch Protection

Although no lens material is “scratch-proof,” it’s important to protect your new lenses with a scratch resistant treatment. Lenses that are treated on the front and backside with a clear, hard coating show increased resistance to scratching. A two-sided scratch resistant treatment is the best choice for optimal scratch resistant protection. Watch the video below and be sure to ask us about adding scratch protection to your lenses!

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From sunburn to skin cancer, almost everyone is aware of the damage ultraviolet (UV) radiation can inflict on their skin. However, very few understand the dangers of UV exposure to their eyesight. In fact, while more than eight out of 10 Americans know that extended UV exposure can cause skin cancer, fewer than one out of 10 know it can harm their eyes. Additionally, 20 percent of Americans mistakenly believe that UV damage is reversible.

Because so few people understand the detrimental effects of UV exposure, many aren’t taking the best steps to protect and preserve their vision. For example, less than half of Americans get a regular eye exam, which can be instrumental in detecting and preventing serious vision problems and eye disease. Additionally, more than four out of 10 people don’t wear UV blocking sunglasses during the winter months when UV rays are still a threat.

Sunglasses Quality Matters
Did you know that wearing an inadequate pair of sunglasses can be worse than wearing no sun protection at all? If a pair of sunglasses offers no UV protection, the wearer is actually increasing his or her exposure to UV rays. The inadequate sunglasses will block some of the light, causing the pupil of the eye to enlarge and allow more light in. This also lets in more UV light, increasing the amount of damaging light reaching the retina. Quality sunglasses are designed to absorb UVA and UVB rays. However, not all sunglasses block 100 percent of UV rays, and therefore may not be effective in preventing sun damage to the eyes.

Considering the potential damage that UV exposure can cause to eyesight, everyone should be wearing lenses that block 100 percent of UVA and UVB rays.

Polarized Lenses Block Glare
Polarized lenses are helpful in blocking polarized light. This type of light is created by reflected light. When bright light bounces off of horizontal surfaces such as water, cars, snow, or the highway, it can cause intense glare. Bright glares make it difficult or impossible to see. Polarized lenses can be beneficial for certain situations, including driving, skiing, and fishing because they cut the scattered light causing a glare. Fishermen, for example, often use polarized lenses to help them see beneath the water and better locate fish. While most polarized lenses have built-in UV-blocking features, it is important to check the lens labeling to determine if the sunglasses offer full protection. Regardless of the type of sun protection chosen, the quality of the lens is important.

Stop by to see us at Parkwood Vision Center to be sure your sunglasses provide 100 percent protection from UVA and UVB rays. If they don’t, we can help you pick out a fashionable pair offer function and protection, too!

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Scratch-Resistant Lenses
Lenses with the best scratch protection are treated on the front and backside with a clear, hard, scratch-resistant coating. This can minimize the damage to your lenses if you accidentally drop them, or clean them with the wrong type of material.

When eyeglass lenses are scratched, they become less clear and are more likely to cause eye fatigue. Scratches also make it harder for others to see your eyes from the front, and may even begin to bother the wearer if scratches are noticeable. There are some treatments that can help your lenses resist scratching and have a longer life.

Some lens materials like polycarbonate and trivex have built-in scratch resistance. However, it’s important to know that not all scratch-resistant treatments offer equal protection. Since most lens treatments are optional, be sure to ask our staff at Parkwood Vision Center for a two-sided scratch-resistant treatment that offers the best protection for your new eyewear investment.

Reduce Digital Eye Strain

Do you get headaches or eyestrain from staring at your computer screen? At the end of a long day in front of your digital devices, is it difficult to focus on objects in the distance? You may be suffering from digital eye strain. With most of the population working on computers for multiple hours a day, Dr. Pope wants to share some information on the benefits of computer lenses.

Protective Eyewear

Whether you’re working on a project at home or at work, eye protection is serious business. According to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), about 2,000 U.S. workers sustain job-related eye injuries requiring medical treatment each day. Of these injuries, 90 percent could have been prevented with the right eye protection. Luckily, specialized eyewear is available from Parkwood Vision Center to provide eye protection and visual enhancement for recreational, industrial, and occupational situations.

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Computer Lenses
According to the American Optometric Association, the average American worker spends seven hours a day on the computer, either in the office or working at home. That’s why digital eye strain or computer vision syndrome is common. Computer vision syndrome is caused by excessive digital screen use. Symptoms include blurry vision, sore and tired eyes, and neck and shoulder pain. Nearsighted people often complain of headaches, eye strain, squinting or fatigue when driving, playing sports, or when looking more than a few feet away.

Special lenses can be used to supplement your primary pair of eyewear. They can solve vision-related problems that result from prolonged computer, tablet, e-reader, and cell phone use by enhancing vision at the near and intermediate distances.

To avoid or reduce digital eye strain, follow the 20-20-20 rule. Every twenty minutes, concentrate on taking a 20-second break to view something 20 feet away.

Are you experiencing symptoms of digital eye strain? Ask Dr. Pope for more information during your next visit.

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The two most common reasons for eye injuries in the workplace are when a worker is wearing the wrong type of protective eyewear for the task, or when they are not wearing any protection at all.

The most common occupations for eye injuries include:

  • Auto repair
  • Carpentry
  • Construction
  • Electrical work
  • Maintenance
  • Manufacturing
  • Mining
  • Plumbing
  • Welding

A Bureau of Labor Statistics survey questioned people who experienced an eye injury in the workplace. The responses revealed that nearly three out of five workers were not wearing eye protection at the time of an accident. These same workers reported they didn’t feel safety eyewear was needed for the job they were doing.

Hazards exist in every home in many different forms such as sharp edges, falling objects, chemicals, noise, and a variety of other potentially dangerous situations. Whether you’re working on a weekend project in the garage or participating in recreational activities, wearing eye protection can significantly reduce the chances of sight damaging injuries.

Parkwood Vision Center can help you select the protective eyewear most appropriate for your job or activity based on a hazard assessment. Please call our office for more information.

Progressive Lenses

Progressive lenses, sometimes called “no-line bifocals,” provide a more youthful appearance by eliminating the visible lines found in bifocal and trifocal lenses. They provide the ability to see at all distances in one seamless lens, including driving at a distance, arm’s length for computer use, and up close for reading.

No Glare Lenses

Have you ever experienced blinding reflections in your lenses from oncoming traffic while driving at night? No-glare, also referred to as an anti-reflective or AR treatment, is specially calculated to eliminate the glare on your lenses and increase the amount of light entering your eye. This is an important safety benefit for driving at night as no-glare lenses reduce annoying reflections and halos around lights.

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Progressive lenses are the most natural form of vision correction available for patients with presbyopia, as they eliminate the “image jump” present in standard bifocal and trifocal lenses. Progressive lenses provide a smooth transition from the distance through intermediate to near vision with all the in-between corrections included.

Who Needs Progressive Lenses?
Even if you’ve never needed glasses before, presbyopia usually occurs in individuals around age 40. As we age naturally, our ability to see objects up close and the computer screen can decrease and can be blurry. Progressive lenses address separate visual needs in one lens.

How Do Progressive Lenses Work?
If you need more than one pair of glasses or prescription to do computer work or drive, progressives let you see clearly at any distance with one pair of glasses. The constant graduation of prescription in progressive lenses enables you to look up to see in the distance, look ahead to view things such as the computer in the intermediate zone, and drop your gaze downward to read, text, or perform other work comfortably up close.

With so many progressive lens designs and options available, the choices can be overwhelming without professional advice. Ask Dr. Pope about progressive lenses at your next visit!

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Reducing glare is beneficial for many reasons. No-glare lenses improve the cosmetic appearance of your glasses by dampening the reflections that mask your eyes when someone is looking at you, making your eyes look more natural. Better yet, most premium no-glare lenses include a special coating that makes them easier to clean along with a two-sided scratch-resistant coating.

Cleaning No-Glare Lenses
Cleaning your no-glare lenses is easy! Always start by wetting the lens and clean it with a soft soap or approved cleaner from Parkwood Vision Center. Don’t ever use window cleaner, or other harsh chemicals as they can damage the lens. Always use a soft, dry cloth to wipe the lenses clean. Never use facial tissue or paper towel as these materials can scratch your lenses.

Be sure to ask for a demonstration of no-glare lenses during your next visit with us!

Order Contacts Online!

Order contacts when it's convenient for you. Available for all offices in the Memorial Eye Center network. New and current patients can now order online anytime.

PROUDLY A PART OF MEMORIAL EYE CENTER

We are a member of the Memorial Eye Center network. Together we serve the diverse communities in Houston and the surrounding areas, helping our friends and neighbors see their world better.